9 Comments

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    heh. I love that photo. I’m super-jealous. You got to meet the whole freaking cast.

  • fuwalda says:

    Yeah, but she was the only one who touched me.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    I wonder if Kristen Bell remembers that day as fondly as you do.

  • fuwalda says:

    It was a pretty memorable day. How could she not?

    Anyway, Kristen Bell is a wonderful actress and one of the most stunningly beautiful women I’ve ever seen, but you are right when you say she hasn’t been good in anything since this show went off the air. In fact, I would even say that she has been unlikable in everything else I’ve seen. This isn’t entirely her fault, however, since she seems to have become typecast as a bitch lately. She was a bitch in that Sarah Marshall movie, a bitch on that show Party Down (some Showtime comedy should by the same creators and producers as Veronica Mars. The first season is worth checking out since it’s pretty funny. Bell is only in one or two episodes, but she got some good jokes.)

    Anyway, as much as I loved the first season of Veronica Mars, I felt it went downhill over the course of the next two seasons. Maybe the original series was so strong nothing else could measure up, or maybe it was that the murder of her best friend was an emotional macguffin that could never be topped. It just became too contrived, too routine, and too predicable. It was still worth watching for the snappy dialogue and excellent cast, but it wasn’t the same.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    I only learned about Party Down yesterday. Watched some clips on YouTube, and now I want to see it. They all had me laughing. Especially this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVszHLWHLo0

    The first season of VM was the best, because it was so fresh and seat-of-the-pants (I mean, if you’d only seen the first few episodes, who would have thought that Veronica would have wound up with Logan, for example?). I really believe that it was probably one of the most interesting shows on television.

    So I was wary about the second and third seasons, because I assumed they couldn’t possibly live up to the benchmark set early on. They probably don’t quite measure up, but they’re still really charming.
    I thought I was going to dislike the third season, particularly, because half the cast changed, but I found it as compulsively watchable as ever, if not quite as memorable.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Oh man…this is cracking me up, too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOuMErLl-0A&feature=related

    I’ve got to see this show. It’s like a Veronica Mars reunion.

  • fuwalda says:

    I keep meaning to write a review of Party Down on my blog, but I never got around to finished the second season before Netflix pulled it, so I lost interested. But here’s my main review in a nutshell: The first season is well worth watching because Ken Marino is friggin’ hilarious. Marino is one of those actors who should be ten times more famous than he is because he’s never not been awesome in eveything I’ve ever seen him in. He was even awesome as that shady detective on Veronica Mars. That bit where he sings “Private Eyes” into the beg that Veronica Mars gives him stands out in my memory as one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen.

    However, the rest of the cast ranges from simply being ok to being downright annoying. Jane Lynch was funny, but she left the show after the first season. Also, Marino’s character was severely changed for the second season into a much less funnier role that completely wasted his comedic talents. But rent the first season because it’s very funny and very easy viewing.

    And, yeah, Veronica Mars reunion. Everybody was in it. The kid who played Dick Casablancas was one of the main stars and there were guest starring roles by Kristen Bell, Jason Dohring, and Enrico Colantoni.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Dick Casablancas is my boy.

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Article

Veronica Mars

About three and a half years ago, Best Buy ran a ridiculous sale on the first season of Veronica Mars. I had been a fan of the show, but I moved to a different state in between the first and second season, and for some reason, I lost track of the series. Which is weird, because I thought it was one of the only worthwhile hour-long dramas on television at the time.

Actually…now that I think back on it, I believe what may have happened is that the local UPN affiliate in Northwest Arkansas was having some sort of dispute with Cox, and I actually couldn’t watch it. But then, even when UPN went away and Veronica Mars aired on CW–which I did get–I felt I had been away from the show for too long, and I didn’t bother to watch.

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11 Comments

  • lily says:

    Definitely–predictable and shallow, to the point that it very quickly becomes cheesy. That’s all I have to say about this movie.

  • fuwalda says:

    I’m glad you didn’t like this movie, because I HATED this movie. When it came out, I had one of those moments where I couldn’t figure out if the whole world had gone crazy or if it was just me. Maybe I’m an idealist or maybe I just don’t have much of a heart, but Sam Jackson’s character — tragic as his predicament may have been — deserved to go to jail (or at least a mental institution – for a long, long time.

    I understand that his daughter was raped (and murdered too maybe. I can’t remember), but if he really thought that the solution to that problem was to go into a public place that was full of people with a machine gun… well… that’s a man that needs to be locked up and kept away from the rest of us for the good of society. Anybody who would do that is either a sociopath or a complete, irresponsible, idiot.. who is also a sociopath. What if one of his bullets had hit somebody else’s daughter?

    The idea that a film (and novel, though I haven’t read it, so maybe it takes a different approach) could be based around such an event and cast the murderer (because that’s what he is) as a hero who did the right thing is offensive. This movie makes me angry just thinking about it. All of the other stuff you said is true too, but the main problem for me was that I spent the entire movie wanting that asshole to be found guilty. Fuck him. He’s a fucking murderer. The other guys were bad too — no question — but didn’t anybody ever tell John Grisham that two wrongs don’t make a right?

    Another problem with this movie is that one of the rednecks that rapes the girl looks and talks exactly like David Cross as Ronnie Dobbs. Who could take that seriously?

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      You know, the reason I was willing to watch this long past the point that my wife gave up on it was because before the movie began, I looked on the IMDb. This movie had something like a 7.1 star rating, and when I read the most recent reviews, they were generally pretty positive. So I thought that there might be something redeeming about A Time to Kill, and in the end, I don’t think there was. Even if you can put aside the central problem with Sam Jackson’s character being clearly guilty (I kept thinking, “Jack McCoy would prosecute the hell out of this guy”), the courtroom drama was still weak and unbelievable, I don’t think there was much chemistry between either McConaughey and Ashley Judd or McConaughey and Sandra Bullock, Donald Sutherland was more or less wasted, and so on.

      It simply wasn’t very good.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Oh, by the way, one of the rapists reminded you of Ronnie Dobbs, but one of the rapists reminded me of that prick who used to hang out with Ash and Noah in Charlottesville. Remember that conservative douchebag who dated that chubby brunette who dyed her hair red? What was his name? Ian? Ian sounds right to me.

  • Anna says:

    this whole thread has seriously made my night.
    I am giggling. And have nothing that could possibly top what’s already been said, but I agree.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    What was it? The guy who said that A Time to Kill forced him to postpone his engagement? Because that still makes me laugh, too.

  • Anna says:

    all of it. “fuck him, he’s a fucking murderer.”
    David Cross. Also bringing up rapist looking like someone in the past. . .
    postponing the engagement.
    yes.

  • fuwalda says:

    I mean, there is a worthy story to be told about a man pushed so far to he brink in his quest for vengeance that he would take the law into his own hands in order to murder the men who raped his daughter. That is a profoundly deep topic so full of shades of gray that nobody could really say what was right, what was wrong, and where morality ends and that kind of vigilanteism could become justified. However, this was a movie about the law, and the law doesn’t (or shouldn’t) allow for shades of gray or debates or morality. This man broke the law, so he should go to jail.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    The moral standpoint of the movie was just so questionable, if not outright objectionable. When SLJ and MM have their talk toward the end of the trial, and SLJ tells him that they’re not friends, and the reason he chose MM for his lawyer was because he’s “one of them” (i.e. white people), and only another white person could make a jury of white folks understand…it bothered me. I felt as though the movie was saying that if I thought SLJ’s character deserved to be convicted, then I’m just a racist white guy whose racism is so ingrained that I don’t even realize I’m racist. I object to that.

  • fuwalda says:

    It’s especially odd considering how all of that dialogue (or, at least, the novel) was written by a Southern white man.

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Article

A Time to Kill

Granted, I don’t remember loving this film even when I first saw it, back when I was younger and probably more easily won over by movies that took on tough issues; but I don’t remember exactly disliking it either. In any case, it either doesn’t stand the test of time or it wasn’t very good in the first place. My wife put it on, watched about a half an hour, and then said, “I’m already bored. This is too predictable.” Then she fell asleep and for some reason, I watched it to the end just to see if it would get any better. It never does.

The problem with A Time To Kill is that it’s just so overwhelmingly average. This same issue, which took over two hours to tell in ATtK, could have been handled in an hour on Law & Order, and the treatment of the issue would have been far more nuanced and wouldn’t have ended with a fairy tale. Sadly, the film really doesn’t have a lot to say, and I wish it did–primarily, because I wouldn’t have wasted over two hours of my life last night.

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11 Comments

  • Balpo says:

    (Stabler may be the most fully realized of any Law & Order detective.)

    Hmm, I think Benson is.

  • lily says:

    Yeah, Goren has by far been my favorite. Too bad we won’t get to see him and Eames in the new episodes anymore.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      I think you either love Goren or your hate him. I love him. As I said, Criminal Intent only really makes sense if it’s a vehicle for D’Onofrio. If he’s off the show, it seems pointless.

  • lily says:

    Exactly.

  • Anne Carol says:

    I think you said something about Benson, Mariska Hargitay. I think she is the great name of the show, she is a fantastic actress, but I also admire Stabler. But Benson is more determined in their fight against criminals.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Well, Benson is more empathetic, so the job seems more meaningful for her because of the women she can help. For Stabler, it seems more about putting bad people in jail.

  • fuwalda says:

    Nicely done.

    I’m willing to give you props and admit that your knowledge of Law and Order mythology is vastly superior to mine. Then again, I’m a Law and Order purist. I can only sit through the original series, and even then it has to have Jerry Orbach. My favorite lineup is Orbach and Ben Bratt, but that probably has a lot to do with how that was the lineup when I started watching. I also like Jesse L Martin and admit that he’s probably a better actor than Bratt, with more nuanced, subtle performances. But I liked Bratt’s character better and thought the chemistry between him and Briscoe was more dynamic.

    I also enjoyed the episodes where Dennis Farina replaced Orbach. He did a good job and created a character who was pretty original and fun to watch. He seemed like a pretty good cop. After that, I gave up. I didn’t like Sisto and I didn’t like the new assistant DA after McCoy got promoted. And, for whatever reason, I’ve never been able to get into any of the shows that have more words in their titles than just Law and Order. They all feel more like generic TV shows to me. They lack that documentary style that makes Law and Order stand out. They seem more about action sequences and long, drawn out interrogation scenes than just straight up, procedural police work. I’ve never actually watched the one with Iced T, but that’s my mom’s favorite. Or is his name Ice T?

    The one with D’Onofrio, however, is my hands down least favorite. D’Onofrio) is a brilliant actor, but his performance is way too quirky for me. That character is just annoying and thoroughly unlikable in my opinion. And that chick is way too mousy. Another thing about the “real” Law and Order is that all of McCoy’s assistants are total hotties.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Well, I agree to a certain extent. In a way, the original Law & Order is my favorite of the three series, because it’s the most pure. It’s almost straight-up exposition, and there’s no wasted energy. Also, I find the legal system to be really fascinating, and it’s pretty typical that half of the episode at least is dedicated to the trial. As much as I think Jack McCoy is the man, I liked Linus Roach as Cutter, too. Whereas McCoy is more about justice and nobody being above the law, Cutter is more about winning and satisfying his ego. It’s a neat pairing between the two D.A.s.

      Anyway, when I said that I almost can’t watch other cop shows now, that’s largely because of the original L&O. Even though the spin-offs take more dramatic licenses, however, I’m still willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

      With regards to Criminal Intent, it probably took me a few episodes to warm up to it, because the way that it’s plotted is so different–it’s more akin to classic detective stories like Poirot than it is to Law & Order–but I love watching D’Onofrio so much that it was pretty easy to accept once I understood the show’s premise. I did think it lost a little bit of its Law & Orderness when Courtney B. Vance left the show.

  • Erin says:

    Great write-up! I was Law and Order junkie for years, until the cancellation of the mothership. I’d have to say they went out on a high note, and the cast was one of my favorite line-up eras (the first being Jill Hennessey era).

    I couldn’t get into Criminal Intent until very recently, when I got tired of SVU. I was surprised by how much I liked it. I think it works more as a standalone as opposed to if you’re just expecting it to work like another Law and Order show. Anyway, I found Goren to be interesting to watch, mostly because of his old school detective antics (good old-fashioned manipulation; using his connection with a member of the press to write something to get the suspect rowled up, using his library card etc).

    I loved Eames equally, and I think she’s my favorite of all the L&O ladies too. There was just something extremely charismatic, yet low-key about her. I don’t think I would’ve liked the show half as much if she wasn’t there to stabilize and keep both the show and Goren from becoming unbearable. After Briscoe and Logan, they’re my favorite detective team. One of the reasons is just that they seemed to enjoy being around each other, like they were having fun messing with these people’s minds (which sounds more sociapathic than I meant it too).

    I watched a couple of the new season here and there, and while I enjoy Nichols, the quality of the casefiles seems to have gone downhill. It’s kind of where SVU was when I stopped watching it. The vampire episode was a little much. But the great thing about these shows is that there are episodes upon episodes in the can, so I can always enjoy those.

  • edna mason says:

    I love all Law and Orders, I can’t tell you how many times I watch reruns. Watching them now with Jerry Obach and Chris Noth. I watch them so much anyone can ask any of my grandkids what I’m watching and they will tell them Law and Order. Its the best and i definitely love Christopher Meloni and that amazing Vincent D’Onofrio they can’t be replacedl. I love Law and Order so much I have the theme song from SVU and my text to Criminal Intent. Best shows ever.

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The Police, Who Investigate Crime…

The institution of Law & Order has been around for 20 years, but I only began watching the various series within this brand a few years back when my wife got me hooked into Special Victims Unit. At this point, I pretty much watch Law & Order (I’m referring to all three series when I use this name) whenever it’s on TV. So in other words, I watch Law & Order all the time, but I only learned recently that the original Law & Order had been cancelled.

Well…shucks. You will be missed, Jack McCoy. And you, too, A.D.A. Michael Cutter.

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8 Comments

  • fuwalda says:

    Never heard of it. Or, at least, if I ever heard of it, I forgot about it. Sounds good. Also, Saïd Taghmaoui is an awesome actor who’s always good.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    It was one of these end of the summer movies that slipped under the radar. Not quite an action film, not quite an edge-of-your-seat thriller. According to IMDb, it only made about $20 million.

  • fuwalda says:

    Don Cheadle is a great actor, but for some reason… I just stopped caring about him. I’m not sure why and I’m not sure when. Hold on… I’m going to check the imdb, cause I remember there was a time when I really liked him, but I can’t remember why…

    Must’ve been around 1998 when he made Out of Sight and that Rat Pack movie. After that, he made a bunch of really shitty movies like Mission to Mars and Swordfish, but he did pop up with a cameo in Rush Hour 2. He must be friends with Chris Tucker or something. Then he made Ocean’s Eleven in 2001, which I enjoyed, but I haven’t seen anything he’s been in since, except for the two awful sequels to Ocean’s Eleven.

    Still… good actor.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    I don’t seek out his movies or anything. There are very few actors I’ll do that for, though. Maybe none.

  • fuwalda says:

    I’ll have to think about it, but I can’t think of any recent actors whose movies I’d see just based on their name alone. *Maybe* Tom Hanks or Will Smith. Also, maybe Russell Crowe or Leo. Actually, come to think about it, definitely Leo. I looked him up recently and Revolutionary Road and Body of Lies (I think that’s the name) are the only movie of his I haven’t seen yet. Oddly enough, Body of Lies also stars Russell Crowe and is directed by Ridley Scott. It’s on my Netflix queue, but I keep adding other stuff first. I’ve probably seen ever Tom Hanks movie.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    This wasn’t necessarily intentional, but since Gangs of New York, I’ve seen every Leonardo DiCaprio film, including Revolutionary Road and Body of Lies. Revolutionary Road was good, though kind of annoying. Or frustrating, perhaps. Body of Lies wasn’t too bad–I liked it all right–but it was sort of forgettable.

    I think Blood Diamond is when I decided I was just going to trust Leo–that was a really cool movie, and I’ve been wanting to see it again ever since. I don’t know if it’s Leo so much as the fact that his films almost always look interesting, but in any case, I watch them.

    My wife is in love with Tom Hanks. The other week, she made me put on Joe Versus the Volcano, since she’d never seen it. Then she fell asleep after ten minutes and I wound up watching it to the end. What a weird, unfulfilling movie. Oh, also, I watched the last 45 minutes or so of Dragnet the other week while I was making dinner. I have nobody to blame for that one but myself. But Tom Hanks is always good.

    There are a bunch of Will Smith movies I haven’t seen, but for the record, I’m one of the few people who seem to have enjoyed Hancock without too many reservations. The pacing was weird and the climax seemed strange, but I had a good time watching it, and it was just…different.

  • fuwalda says:

    I just looked up my boy Tom Hanks. I still have’t seen Toy Story 3, but other than that, I’ve seen everything he’s been in since the mid 80s. And among those, I’ve seen everything except a few obscure films that nobody has seen. So my point is this: Traitor should have more Tom Hanks.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Tom Hanks is to movies what cowbell is to music.

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Traitor

Rating: ★★★½☆ 

Mark this down in the column of films that I thought were going to be one sort of movie but turned out to be something else entirely (see also Green Zone). It has been a couple of years since Traitor was released, though I’m reasonably certain this was marketed as a sort of Boune-like globetrotting action film. But you be the judge.

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16 Comments

  • fuwalda says:

    I would’ve skipped it too.

  • fuwalda says:

    Oh, and so would you. 😉

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Nah, if they’d done something like this when we were entering college, everybody would have gone. I think it would have been more expected that you’d go at Goucher than it was here.

  • fuwalda says:

    I remember when we were incoming freshmen and Catch 22 was required reading before we got there. I was safe because I had already read it, but nobody else had. Amar hadn’t. Keith hadn’t. Did you read it? If you say yes, I’m going to quiz you.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    I did read it, but I barely remember anything about it. I remember the movie better. What I do remember is that the book put me to sleep many times. I don’t know why–it was just a slog for me. Outcasts United was a very brisk read. You didn’t have to always be thinking about what you were reading.

    I should probably try to reread Catch-22 someday. Maybe I’d like it more now.

  • fuwalda says:

    And sure, I’ll agree that this is *maybe* a well intentioned assignment, but again… I don’t blame the incoming frosh for skipping the assignment. Why would anybody need a shared literary experience with a bunch of strangers, most of whom they’ll never even meet, only to have one or two discussions about a book that was chosen for the entire student body at large? I think a better idea would be to have a few choices, and then the discussion groups could’ve been based around those.

    Or, even better, don’t have any reading assignments at all. It’s summer and they aren’t even in college yet. They just graduated from high school and are on their way to becoming adults, and they get more homework from the school they haven’t even started? Fuck that shit, man. I’d sleep all summer too. Who the hell wouldn’t? It doesn’t mean your lazy if you sleep all summer between your last year of high school and your first year of college. It means you’re smart and understand that’s the last time you’ll ever get to do that for the rest of your fucking life.

    Pardon my French.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Come on–in an entire summer, these kids can’t sacrifice maybe three hours of vegging out to at least get the gist of the book? This is about the easiest thing anybody is going to ask you to do in your college career, so you may as well do it and try to get something out of it.

    If all I had to do in school was read books and show up to talk about them, I’d have been the best student ever. It was all of the writing assignments and other homework I hated.

  • fuwalda says:

    I just think it’s a silly assignment that serves no purpose other than letting the college administrators say that they are doing something. Meh. Wait until they get there before you give them homework.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    And I disagree. I think it’s a good way of providing students some sort of intellectual stimulation that will warm them up for the college experience and maybe help them to make connections with students who, as you say, they might otherwise not have any other reason to associate with over the course of their college career.

  • fuwalda says:

    High school was some sort of intellectual stimulation that warmed them up for college.

  • Andrea Blum says:

    You can bet your life I never would have taken any of that malarky! You guys had to read a few books. Do you remember “A Thousand Acres?” That’s just one of the ones I remember you reading. Justin, I absolutely agree with you. Do you think the world has changed so much since you went to college that students just can’t value this type of experience? Oh-Fuwalda-notice how I’m just disregarding the fact that you’re from the same generation as Justin. That’s because I don’t really believe you feel that way. You can’t convince me otherwise (but I still like you!)

  • fuwalda says:

    My mom would’ve been of the same opinion as me: Once you graduate high school, it’s no longer a parent’s job to nag their children about homework.

    • Andrea Blum says:

      In my job I meet a lot of people who have achieved a fairly high level of excellence in their lives. Many of them tell me they would never have amounted to anything if they hadn’t been pushed by parents(and that includes time after high school). Since I heard this story from Justin, I’ve told it to a few people. They all say their parents wouldn’t have tolerated their slacking off like that. Being 18 doesn’t mean you’re ready to make good decisions.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    To this day, I still need nagging. I think that’s the lifetime responsibility of parents.

    Yeah, A Thousand Acres…I thought I had to read that for my Freshman year. I just couldn’t remember if that was for a class or if everybody had to read it.

  • fuwalda says:

    That was that dumb book based on King Lear, only set in the rural midwest or something. Don’t rewrite Shakespeare, people. Get your own damn stories.

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Outcasts United

The University at which I work does a summer reading assignment for Freshmen. It has a noble intention, I think, in that it attempts to provide the entire incoming class with a shared literary experience. The semester starts on Monday, but the Freshmen have already arrived for their various orientation events. Today was meant to be the day that these students would be divided up into book discussion groups so that they might enjoy their first quasi-academic college encounter.

I volunteered early on to be a discussion leader for this event, since I’ve got some experience running book clubs at my previous public library position. I also enjoy discussing books and other forms of recreational entertainment, as should be obvious from this blog.

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Happy Birthday

My birthday is today, so I’ve been looking over IMDb’s “Born on this Day” list. I had to go all the way back to 1890 before I found anybody cool: H. P. Lovecraft. If it weren’t for Lovecraft, I might just have been the most awesome person every born on August 20th.

I suppose I can live with being the second most awesome person.

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Spam-a-lot

No, this isn’t about the Monty Python play, but rather some of the hilarious spam that I get on this blog. I’ll tell you…these spam bots are getting better. As experienced as I am with the Internet, I still have to read some of these things twice to attempt to determine whether or not they’re legitimate. Thankfully, Askimet automatically tags the vast majority of spam for me, and in my experience, I’ve never seen a false positive. I don’t ever have to see them if I’d prefer not to, but I still enjoy reading over some of the spam comments, regardless. Here are a few of my recent favorites:

im writing this comment and watching rambo 3 at the same time lol. the bookends to the rocky kovies were mr favorites of the series..and yeah rocky balboa does tug on ones heart, it was hard for me to watch at a couple of points, most notably the meathouse scene with him and paualie.

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  • fuwalda says:

    I was all impressed with your post’s title, until I watched that Daily Show clip and realized you stole it from them. Heh.

    And, yeah, this wasn’t a great piece. It seemed to lack bite and focus. And, all things considered, Obama’s comment was absolutely nothing. It wasn’t the least bit of a retraction to my ears.

    And, yeah, they should build their little building wherever they buy or rent land, so long as they follow whatever zoning laws dictate where that particular kind of real estate property can be erected. I find it hard to get worked up over a real estate deal, which is all this is. Call me over when they actually start construction and bring in the bulldozers and stuff, if only because bulldozers are cool.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    heh. I didn’t mean to try to take credit for that title. The problem is that I can’t embed Comedy Central clips in the blog, so you’ve got to follow the link to discover that ripped it off.

    Yeah, this is just the thing–if you’re the sort of person who would get all worked up about this, you’re probably not voting for somebody like Harry Reid anyway.

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Mosque-Erade

Harry ReidI feel somewhat compelled to mention this, since I live in Nevada now and Harry Reid recently remarked (sort of) about this mosque that’s slated to be erected in the vicinity of Ground Zero in New York City. His statement was fairly mild, but it feels like a bit of needless politicking, regardless. Give your supporters a little more credit for not being so easily whipped up into emotional hysteria over an issue for which the precedent is clearly spelled out in the United States Constitution.

I like you, Harry, and even if you weren’t running against the maniacal Sharron Angle, I’d still vote for you. But this ain’t your business.

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  • fuwalda says:

    I had a friend in high school who loved this movie and always said it was his favorite of all time. So finally a bunch of us agreed to watch it with him… and we hated it. Heh. It was so damn boring. He thought we were all crazy, but it’s nice to hear your opinion validating our reaction. I also never read the book.

  • fuwalda says:

    I don’t know why I threw the world “also” in there, since it doesn’t make much sense grammatically.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    It’s a weird favorite film, since it’s so boring. My wife fell asleep after about five minutes, and then woke up and fell asleep a few more times. Originally, I wasn’t going to write more than a sentence or two about this, and one of the sentences was going to be, “Only see this movie if you like big, hairy vaginas.”

    Until this came on TV yesterday, I didn’t even know it existed.

  • fuwalda says:

    It says something about this movie that it was *so boring* I don’t even remember seeing any big, hairy vaginas. Then again, at the time I saw it, I was living in Europe, where big and hairy are the vaginas of choice.

    And this is unrelated, but why doesn’t my Firefox spell-checker recognize “vaginas”? Is that not the proper pluralization?

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Mozilla takes a firm “anti-orgy” position: they don’t believe there should ever be more than one vagina.

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Nineteen Eighty-Four

Rating: ★★☆☆☆ 

It has been years and years since I’ve read the Orwell novel upon which this film was based. I won’t speak much to the source material, which suffice it to say is thought-provoking and still relevant (see the way that politicians–sometimes in cahoots with the media–employ talking points and language to twist public discourse and subvert abstract thought, e.g. “death panels”, or even the way history is constantly being rewritten–which is far too large of a discussion to get into here, so I’ll just link this).

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  • fuwalda says:

    I ranked this movie #6 on my list of the top ten funniest movies of all time, and I showed this same clip:

    http://blessedarethegeeks.blogspot.com/2009/05/top-ten-funniest-movies-ever.html

    In retrospect, I’d probably put it even higher if I ever redid that list. It’s just brilliant.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    Nothing at all to do with Monty Python, but I read your blog post just now and noticed you had Brain Candy on there, which reminded me that I saw Dave Foley and Kevin McDonald on one of these gossipy news shows the other day. Dave Foley got really fat and even though he has a beard now, he’s somehow strangely even more effeminate than he was back when he was the most attractive Kid in the Hall in drag. Anyway, apparently the Kids in the Hall have done some new mini-series. I don’t know when or if it’s coming on in the U.S.

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Do you find it risible?

Filed under “funniest things ever” is this scene from Monty Python’s Life of Brian. It loses its punch a little bit if you’ve already seen it, but I still remember gasping for air the first time I watched the film. I suppose part of what makes this so funny is the same reason that outtakes are so amusing when some actor simply can’t deliver his lines because he’s working so hard to keep a straight face.

That one Centurion’s fish face gets me every single time. I’m pretty sure you even begin to see Michael Palin losing it there.

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