3 Comments

  • fuwalda says:

    I’ll be honest, I try to avoid stuff like this because I haven’t had a gaming PC in years. I’ll admit that I love my 360 and my Macbook, but I do miss MMRPGs. A little while ago I tried to get back into WoW on my Mac, but it just wasn’t the same.

    Still… this game looks phat.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    When I began playing WoW, I thought it was the best game ever. And it _was_ pretty good, but it’s weird that I never made it past level 40 or something like that. After a while, it started feeling a little grindy, and I began just trying all of the different classes to check them out, but never getting very far. Good game, but I’m not sure it really deserves to be pretty much the only successful game in the genre. I actually thought Age of Conan was better, at least compared with where it was a half a year after launch and where WoW was at the same time.

    The reason I’m interested in this game is because it seems as though it will have a shitload of story-driven elements, such that it will almost play like a single-player RPG a lot of the time…except for the MMO part. Also…because it’s Star Wars.

  • fuwalda says:

    I’ve played a lot of MMRPGs (though probably not as many as you, because you’re a huge nerd… heh heh), and WoW was the only one that really hooked me and get me going, until around… I don’t remember. I think I quit somewhere in the mid 40s. Did it deserve to be the most successful? Maybe, if only because it was so user friendly and fun for even casual gamers.

    That Camelot game was also very good. I never did play Conan, although it looked cool. I have some hack and slash Conan game on the 360, if that gets me anything.

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Only Troopers Are So Precise

You know how the troopers in the original Star Wars trilogy were supposed to be awesome, but they couldn’t hit the broad side of the barn? I think Star Wars: The Old Republic is going to redeem them even more so than the prequel trilogy did. Granted, this game occurs during a different time period…

This is a trailer showing the alternate progression tracks you can take as a Galactic Republic trooper in the upcoming game.

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8 Comments

  • Anna says:

    I hear you. A lot.

    Honestly, I haven’t seen the entire thing of Avatar yet, but I liked what I saw. THe only reason I avoided the theater was because of the 3-d, I have a motion sickness thing, maybe I’ve told you about this.

    But I agree with what you’ve written. I’m all for literacy, free expression, and jeez, even intellectual banter about films, but I think you’re right, there are some viewers out there who just hate, just to hate or complain, or to I don’t know, one-up everyone with hating and complaining.

    I’ve tried to get better about this myself, because clearly, many of the films I like are not what the rest of society would deem masterpieces. . . I’ve started saying “this was not for me” instead of “this was made for idiots who don’t care about plot,” but now, more than ever, I see films to be entertained. WHY GO, otherwise? Sometimes I think people seriously need to lighten up.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      I guess it’s the extreme dislike for the film that bothers me. If nothing else, you should be able to turn off your brain and be entertained by Avatar, because it’s ridiculously entertaining. James Cameron is almost incapable of making films that aren’t ridiculously entertaining.

  • fuwalda says:

    I think some people just like to hate on whatever is popular, and since Avatar is pretty much the most popular movie around, it’s going to get its fair share of hate. I don’t think Jim Cameron is losing any sleep over it, so neither should you. But I’ll agree that it’s annoying when people hate something using reasoning that is demonstrably stupid, such as the canard that they Na’vi look like Smurfs, etc. They do look like the Nightelves from WoW, however. 😉

    I was fairly critical of this film when it came out over on my blog (plug plug plug!), but I still admitted that, for all its flaws, structural problems, and flat out out missteps in the development of the story, it’s still a fantastically entertaining movie. I think it’s a kind of dumb movie with a cliched, trite story, but I still own the Blu Ray and rewatch it all the time because it’s a lot of fun, is stunningly beautiful (especially in HD), and Stephen Lang’s scenery-chewing performance as Colonel Quaritch made for one of the most awesomely bad-ass villains ever. Seriously, there is no movie that wouldn’t be better for an appearance by that character. He’s too cool.

    So… yeah. I can understand why some people don’t like the film, since I understand and agree much of the criticisms leveled against it. But I also understand why some people love it, since I understand and agree with much of the praise given to it. You know… it’s just a movie, and a really cool on at that.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Yeah, I didn’t have a problem with your review, even though I might not have agreed with everything in it.

      You know, on this topic, the other thing that bothers me is how all of these Star Wars fans despise the prequel movies and don’t even like to talk about them. Hey, they had their problems–I’ll be the first to admit that–but they’re Star Wars! There was still a lot of good stuff in there.

  • Echelon says:

    I think the biggest complaint I heard was that teh storyw as basically just a retelling of Pocahontas(sp?).

    I usually reply with, what film have you seen lately that was truly original and not somewhat derived from another work in the past 50-60 years?

    I think the biggest thing that people miss is how deep the story of the main character really is. The complaints I’ve seen and that you’ve listed are all about things that are on the surface of the film, ignoring the fact that its the story of a man who can’t use his legs getting the chance to use them again and then in the end (spoiler alert) choosing to be something completely different from his former self in order to walk again. Love story? Yeah, perhaps; but I doubt his love for a hot alien was the largest selling point for being a giant alien with super strength and speed when your former self was crippled from the waist down. I think I just went on a tangent, sorry.

    Everyone is a film critic these days, and that is the biggest unfortunate downside to the internet and subsequent blogs. Nobody watches a movie just to watch a movie anymore. They don’t go in with the blissfully ignorant outlook of a film-goer. Instead they are watching it so they can post about how much they loved/hated it on their Facebook or write it down into their blog.

    No one is more guilty of being part of the blogsphere than me, but I can honestly say that as a huge film buff, I go into every movie expecting the best and it is very hard to disappoint me. I’m pretty easy to please when it comes to film, and while it wasn’t the best film ever or even the best science fiction ever; it certainly was a grade A experience.

    • Echelon says:

      As a side note, I’m having a hard time not googlemapping you for future murder for saying anything negative about Inception!

      • Justin Garrett Blum says:

        I’ll tell you the weird thing about this comment: the very day that you posted this, a few of my sites got attacked by a malicious script injection. (Don’t worry–it’s nothing that was effective.) So now I’m wondering who I pissed off.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Oh, right–that it rips off Pocahontas! I forgot about that one!

      “Everyone is a film critic these days, and that is the biggest unfortunate downside to the internet and subsequent blogs.”

      True. I recognize the irony here: that I, myself, am a very amateur critic of films complaining about other amateur critics. But I suppose I’m comfortable with that irony. I do often try not to portray my opinions as facts, and I’m fully open to differences of opinion, but I tend to dislike meaningless opinions that aren’t based upon anything but a one-liner.

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Avatar Hate

I haven’t posted in a while, so just for the hell of it, I’ll ask this question: what’s with all of the hate on the film Avatar? Personally, I thought it was awesome, but I’ve heard so many people say that they couldn’t even make it through the film, or that it was the worst movie of the year, etc. I could certainly see not being as enamored of it as 95% of the top critics on Rotten Tomatoes, but to proclaim that it was an awful film–to me–just reflects a certain ignorance about filmmaking.

I’ve never heard a compelling reason for why Avatar sucked. It’s always something dumb like, “Oh, it’s like somebody played World of Warcraft and made a movie out of it,” or “The Na’vi look like smurfs.” I don’t even really consider the complaint that it’s a transparent voice for simplistic tree-hugger philosophy a real complaint. It has nothing to do with story.

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9 Comments

  • fuwalda says:

    As I’ve said before, no character who died in the Star Wars films stayed dead in the expanded universe, with the exception of Mace Windu, who for whatever reason has gone unresurrected. That’s just racism right there.

    Anyway, I don’t mind this trend because it lets people tell fun stories about these characters. Having Fett escape the Sarlacc is ok, since he was wearing armor and all, but having him kill it is dumb. I’m gonna have to write the story where it turns out the Sarlacc didn’t actually die…

    As for Darth Maul surviving… heh… I actually read that story in some comic way back when. It started out as a simple story about Obi Wan visiting Luke as a baby, when Maul jumped out with his weird, spider legs and they started fighting. Yeah, it was pretty dumb. Everybody knows Maul was killed by Wedge’s grandfather.

  • Justin Garrett Blum says:

    That would be an awesome story–the sarlacc survives, then crawls out of its pit and starts hunting Boba Fett.

    huh? Who’s Wedge’s grandfather?

  • fuwalda says:

    I was just joking.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      That’s funny. I thought you might have actually been privvy to some arcane piece of lore. Also, I heard that Darth Maul returns in the Clone Wars CG series, so I considered that maybe there was some sort of alternative canon.

  • fuwalda says:

    Two questions:

    1. What race is the Sarlacc?

    2. How long until some writer creates a Sarlacc Jedi?

  • Anna says:

    wow. i’ll have to pay attention when my kids watch clone wars—if he really does come back they’re going to pee themselves. SARLACC JEDI!

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Well, I might have that wrong. I don’t watch the show, but I do know that his brother, or whatever, is a character, and I’ve seen on YouTube that Maul appears in some sort of crystal ball or something. So maybe that’s the extent of it.

  • fuwalda says:

    From Wookieepedia:

    “After being swallowed by the tongue, the victim made its way into the sarlacc’s stomach to be digested, purportedly being kept alive and slowly digested for a millennium. A strong network of vessels inside the stomach punctured the victim’s skin and muscles and then embedded itself into victims before injecting neurotoxins into them, preventing the victims from escaping and ensuring that they remained immersed in the acidic fluids in the stomach, and attached to the walls of the stomach.

    The vessels also provided victims with nutrients to keep them alive while they were digested in agony; sometimes when a victim was in the stomach for a long time period, the sarlacc actually embedded it in the lining of the stomach to make room for other victims it swallowed and to make the stomach stronger so that other victims could not escape.

    A number of smaller, secondary stomachs were used to store victims for later consumption at times when the sarlacc needed larger amounts of nutrients, such as when it needed to grow, breed, or strengthen its tentacles and beak for catching stronger, larger prey. The secondary stomachs also functioned as a space to store victims when the main stomach ran out of room, although this was rare. The acidic fluids in the stomachs was composed of powerful chemicals that took much longer to digest prey than acids in the stomach of other creatures. They specifically targeted skin and muscle tissue, because that was where the nutrients in the victims were. The secondary stomachs were also lined with more vessels and were smaller and more cramped to enclose the victims in, so that the sarlacc did not have to deal with the victim trying to escape its hold. The pain endured by its victims in this process was reputed to be unimaginable, with only rare individuals such as Boba Fett being able to resist.

    In addition to the acidic fluids that digested the outer portions of the victims, the sarlacc also processed its victims from within. The sarlacc’s blood was highly caustic, and was employed in the digestion of prey. The tendrils and vessels pumped the sarlacc’s acidic blood into its victims to digest the inside of their bodies, and to carry back nutrients from the victims. This process also provided the victims with minimal sustenance. ”

    That’s awful.

    • Justin Garrett Blum says:

      Yikes. Boba Fett may have been a dick, but he didn’t deserve that. I’m glad he escaped.

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More Stupid Stuff Learned at Wookieepedia

Boba Fett survived falling into the stomach of the Sarlacc.

But the Sarlacc could never hold Fett. After conversing with a fellow captive, the Choi known as Susejo, Fett discovered that this being was actually psychologically connected to the Sarlacc—and it was this advantage that he used to goad the creature into contracting around his jet pack, igniting the device and providing his means of escape, killing the Sarlacc in the process. The resulting explosion, combined with the beast’s acidic stomach juices, left Fett on the verge of death. As he lay dying on the surface of Tatooine, his colleague Dengar was searching for anything valuable left from the explosion, but found Boba Fett instead, and nursed him back to health.

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